World Sepsis Day 2015


Event Details


Sepsis is one of the most common, least-recognized illnesses in both the developed and developing world. Globally, 20 to 30 million patients are estimated to be afflicted every year, with over 6 million cases of neonatal and early childhood sepsis and over 100,000 cases of maternal sepsis.

Worldwide, a person dies from sepsis every few seconds.

The UBC community has made recent breakthroughs in the treatment and diagnosis of Sepsis and our understanding of the disease model itself. Help us welcome speakers, Keith Walley, and John Boyd, both from the Center for Heart Lung Innovation, UBC & St. Paul’s Hospital and Mark Ansermino from the Child and Family Research Centre. Our lead talk will be an overview from Niranjan “Tex” Kissoon, Vice-Chairman of the Global Sepsis Alliance Executive Board who will tell us about the coordination efforts for a UN sanctioned Day for Sepsis, the first step to increase awareness and funding for this neglected disease.

Speakers:

Dr. Niranjan (Tex) Kissoon, VP Medical Services, BC Children’s Hospital and Vice-Chairman, Global Sepsis Alliance Executive Board

Dr. Keith Walley, Professor, Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, UBC & St. Paul’s Hospital

Dr. John Boyd, Assistant Professor, Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, UBC & St. Paul’s Hospital

Dr. Mark Ansermino, Assistant Professor and Senior Clinician Scientist, Child & Family Research Institute

Presentations will be in the Paetzold Auditorium in the Jim Pattison Pavilion of Vancouver General Hospital. Enter through the 12th avenue entrance and the auditorium is straight past the info desk, down the hall, and just past the elevators.

Poster available here: http://ngdi2.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2015/08/World-Sepsis-Day-2015-Poster.pdf

Website: http://ngdi.ubc.ca/?p=11647

Sponsored by: Neglected Global Diseases Initiative, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute

Location:
Paetzold Auditorium
899 West 12th Avenue
v6h 3z6
Canada

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